Round Bar vs Drill Rod vs Shafting – What’s the Difference

Difference Between Round Bar, Drill Rod, and Shafting

Are you confused about the differences between round bars, drill rods, and shafting? It can be difficult to determine which type of rod is best for ensuring your work achieves the highest levels of accuracy. Fortunately, we’re here to help. In this article, you will learn the basics of each material: how they differ in formability, machinability, workability and more. Finally, understand which one is ideal for various applications with ease!

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Round Bar

A round bar is a long, cylindrical metal bar that is exactly what it appears to be. Round bar is available in various plastics, including hot rolled or cold rolled steel, stainless steel, titanium, alloy steel, brass, and others, and in diameters ranging from 1/4″ to 24″.

Aluminum Round Bars

Aluminium round bars are light, corrosion-resistant, and easy to mill and cut. Trim, shafts, brackets, pins, and dowels are some of the most common applications for aluminium round bars.

Brass Round Bars

Brass round bars are used when power, electrical conductivity, corrosion resistance, and spark resistance are required. Brass has an enticing sheen when brushed and is simple to machine. Brass bar applications include sea hardware, instruments, fasteners, and fixtures.

Stainless Steel Round Bars

The two types of SS Round bars are hot and cold rolled. Hot rolled round bar is frequently used in construction applications where a perfect finish and precise dimensions are not required. On the other hand, a cold rolled round bar is used in applications that demand a high surface finish and precise dimensions. Steel round bar is commonly used in frameworks, supports, braces, shafts, and axles. Stainless Steel Round Bars are highly resistant to corrosion. Stainless steel is resistant to high acidity levels and can be used in chlorinated or alkaline environments.

Drill Rods

Drill rods are made of tool steel precisely ground to a diameter resistance. Drill rods are typically oval in shape, but they can also be square. Before being machined, they are frequently tempered. The steel is heated in this procedure to soften it and make it more workable. The steel is air-cooled until machining can begin. Drill rods are frequently used to manufacture drill bits, taps, dowel pins, shafts, and reamers. They are also used to make hammers, files, and punches.

Drill Rods are Classified into Two Types.

Water-hardened drill rods are less alloyed than oil-hardened ones and can be machined faster. The rod is heated to a red glow before being immersed in a vat of water to cool during the water-hardening process. As a result, a hard, robust, easily machined metal is created. It is not, however, suitable for welding. Water-resistant drill rods are used in the manufacture of hammers and files.

Oil Hardened Drill Rods

Water-hardened drill rods are less alloyed than oil-hardened ones and can be machined faster. The rod is heated to a red glow before being immersed in a vat of water to cool during the water-hardening process. As a result, a hard, robust, easily machined metal is created. It is not, however, suitable for welding. Water-resistant drill rods are used in the manufacture of hammers and files.

Shafts

Shafting, also known as Turned Ground and Polished Shafting, is a term used to describe circular bars made of high-quality, precise steel. They are brushed to ensure that the surfaces are perfectly smooth and straight. The manufacturing process is designed to achieve extremely tight tolerances for surface finish, roundness, hardness, and straightness, resulting in a long service life with little maintenance.

Temperature measurement instruments, laboratory equipment, high-speed motor shafts, drive shafts, pump shafts, and ball bushings are all examples of high-accuracy applications that use shafting bars. The bar is frequently expected to rotate at full speed in these situations. As a result, extreme straightness is essential for avoiding excessive vibration and bearing wear.

Induction Hardening is Used to Harden the Shafts.

Induction hardening is a non-contact heating method that generates heat through electromagnetic induction. The material is subjected to a strong alternating magnetic field, which causes an electric current to flow through it and generate heat. The steel’s heart remains unaffected throughout this process and retains its physical properties. The surface layer develops an extremely hard martensitic structure after quenching the steel in water, oil, or a special polymer.

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